Monthly Archives: April 2012

Thesis-1.5

*TURNING POINT

Forni, P.M. Choosing Civility: The Twenty-five Rules of Considerate Conduct. St. Martin’s Griffin, 2003. Print.

Four points frame this book- Civility is complex, civility is good, whatever civility might be, it has to do with courtesy, politeness, and good manners, and civility belongs in the realm of ethics.

“Courtesy, politeness, manners, and civility are all , in essence, forms of awareness. Being civil means being constantly aware of others and weaving restraint, respect, and consideration into the very fabric of this awareness. It entails an active interest in the well-being of our communities and even a concern for the health of the planet.”

Choose Civility Website- Howard County MD

While the Choose Civility initiative was inspired by Dr. Forni’s 25 rules of considerate conduct, Howard County has chosen to promote 15 of his rules as guiding ideas and principles that resonate with the community.  Choose Civility promotes the following:

Pay attention
Listen
Speak kindly
Assume the best
Respect others’ opinions
Respect other people’s time and space
Be inclusive
Acknowledge others
Accept and give praise
Apologize earnestly
Assert yourself
Take responsibility
Accept and give constructive criticism
Refrain from idle complaint

http://www.choosecivility.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=50&Itemid=109

High Line Art Project

“Julianne Swartz, Digital Empathy.” Web. 29 Apr. 2012. http://www.thehighline.org/about/public-art/swartz

Julianne Swartz’s sound installation, Digital Empathy, greets High Line visitors with a variety of messages. At some sites, computer-generated voices speak messages of concern, support, and love, intermingled with pragmatic information. In other sites, those same digitized voices recite poetry and sing love songs to park visitors.

Installed in 11 different locations throughout the park, the sound is transmitted through the park’s bathroom sinks, water fountains, and elevators. These sites are not only unexpected places in which to encounter public art, they are places designed for individuals or small numbers of people, allowing for intimate encounters within an otherwise sprawling, communal space. The locations for Swartz’s sound interventions are indicated by graphic-based signage created by the artist that mimics standard public information signs.

Digital Empathy plays on the notion that, in our culture, we turn to technologies like online social networking, blogs, and instant messages to meet our basic human need for friendship and personal connection.

Advertisements

Empathy

When we talk about civility are we talking about our perceptions of equalness? OR empathy?

Julianne Swartz – High Line Project

http://www.thehighline.org/about/public-art/swartz

Julianne Swartz’s sound installation, Digital Empathy, greets High Line visitors with a variety of messages. At some sites, computer-generated voices speak messages of concern, support, and love, intermingled with pragmatic information. In other sites, those same digitized voices recite poetry and sing love songs to park visitors.

552 – Final Performance Rehearsal

Be prepared if you want to see all the photos of our rehearsal there is 77 photos! The final performance on April 20, 2012 at A1 Lab Arts in Knoxville was about 35 mins complete with full costumes/body movements/fog machine/audience participation and a standing ovation. I am so proud and grateful to work with my fellow grad students.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.